Tag: P3Steel

Tag archive for all things to do with the P3Steel Prusa i3 3D Printer, and mine. The P3Steel is a remix of Twelvepro’s redesign of Josef Prusa’s i3.

A little info about the P3Steel Prusa i3 3D Printer:

P3Steel Prusa i3 3D PrinterLeonardo – the prototype P3Steel printer – was designed and built by Irobri in April 2013, after attending a local Maker show in Zaragoza, Spain. The main frame structure, built from laser-cut 3mm steel, is extremely strong and simple to assemble, and eliminates the need for several printed parts due to the use of steel parts instead of threaded rods for the “Y” subframe (as in the original Prusa i3 and many of its variants).

Steel as a building material has several advantages over e.g. aluminum
Steel is one of the least expensive building materials available – structural steel is 10 times cheaper than aluminum.
Laser cutting steel is easier and cheaper than cutting aluminum.
Steel is stronger than aluminum.
Disadvantages
Steel is 3 times heavier than aluminum, although this could be considered both an advantage and a disadvantage, in the sense that a heavier frame does not tend to vibrate as much as a lighter frame. Also, if we consider the total weight of the printer, the difference between an aluminum frame and a comparable steel frame is not that much (around 2.5kg extra).
Structural (carbon) steel requires painting or galvanizing for protection against corrosion. Stainless steel, of course, does not require painting.

The P3Steel design is for 3mm thick steel and with lots of carvings to reduce weight. All square holes and tabs have special rounded corners for accommodating corresponding parts and give a very good fit between parts.

The design has slots for M3 nuts in the places where the screws fit so no threading is required.

Improvements over the standard Prusa i3

  • Stronger frame due to the use of structural steel.
  • Solves the frame flexing thanks to its reinforcement squares.
  • Simplifies the construction, eliminating the complex subframe of threaded rods in the Y-axis.
  • Once assembled, everything is in place, no adjustments needed.
  • Eliminates the need for several printed parts.
  • The steel mounts for motors and rods are much stronger than their plastic counterparts.
  • The only two threaded rods needed are the ones for the Z-axis (5mm).
  • Uses shorter smooth rods lowering the build costs.
  • Once assembled, it forms a compact, solid structural unit that can be transported as a block.

P3Steel Build Log (#19) – Installing All Connections to RAMPS

By ChunkySteveo,

The RAMPS board is going to get very cramps, very quickly. It’s well designed and thought out in terms of layout, but as you add more and more connections to it, it’s going to get hidden beneath a nest of wires, connections, crimps and fans – say goodbye to your lovely clean clear red board!

P3Steel Build Log (#14) – Heated Bed / Build Plate

By ChunkySteveo,

When building a 3D printer, there are lots of options you can go with for a build platform, and whether to have it heated or not. I will not go into all of them, but simply state what I am going to use compared to Toolson’s designs.

P3Steel Build Log (#13) – Print Bed Silicone Dampeners

By ChunkySteveo,

To support the print bed from the y-axis and the bed frame Prusa 3D printers use bolts, washers and nuts on each corner with a spring for tension. Toolson’s edition of the P3Steel does away with these springs and opts for a novel (genius) solution of using silicone dampeners.

P3Steel Build Log (#12) – RAMPS and Arduino Mega (aka The Brain!)

By ChunkySteveo,

For this printer I will be using the standard and simple setup of an Arduino Mega and a RAMPS 1.4 board. The Arduino Mega is the brains of the printer and will process all the g-code instructions from the .gcode files from either an SD card or over USB and tell the printer how to move, heat up, extrude filament etc by signalling all the motors, heaters and sensors on the printer which are connected via the RAMPS board, which in turn is connected to the Arduino Mega via the GPIO pins.

3D Printing Time Lapse – Mount Saint Helens – Thingiverse

By ChunkySteveo,

New 3D printing time lapse test using my P3Steel. Still yet to install Octoprint or a webcam, so have been testing with taking time lapse sequences on my old Canon Powershot A570 and a custom firmware from CHDK. This was for my eldest daughter who is in high school for her Geography class.