Tag: P3Steel Build Log

P3Steel Prusa i3 3d Printer Steel Frame P3Steel Build LogThis is for all posts to do with the main P3Steel build log for my Prusa i3 Steel 3d printer, aka the P3Steel. I am building a P3Steel 2.5 DXL frame version, with all plastic parts from the improved Toolson Edition which can be found on Thingiverse here.

P3Steel Build Log Start to Finish

The posts should all be numbered in chronological order, so if you want to follow along with the build – start with Build Log #01 and work your way up! Depending on when you read this, I may be finished with the build and the P3Steel build log, or I may be stuck! Updates will come as and when I get them written up, along with some good clear photographs and maybe even a YouTube video or two!? After the P3Steel build log is complete, any other news will be tagged with just P3Steel.

P3Steel Toolson MK2

I’m actually building the MK2 version of Toolson’s designs, which are NOT on Thingiverse, but can still be found from Lars via his personal blog – http://scheuten.me/?page_id=708. All credit for the plastic parts has to go to Lars, aka Toolson!


P3Steel Build Log (#10) – Z-Axis

By ChunkySteveo,

Following on from the x-axis build – I skimmed over the last part, just “installing with the z-axis rods and threaded M5 screw”. This post helps to expand on this part, installing the x-axis and carriage onto the printer with the installation of the z-axis smooth 8mm rods and the z-axis screw – which for this build is the standard M5 threaded rod. Read on!

P3Steel Build Log (#08) – Y-axis Rod Stops

By chunkyadmin,

Either by fault of my own or tolerances in the steel rod or frame after successfully wiggling and inserting the rod, they did not fit snug and were not tight enough, This caused the rods to move as the print bed went back and forth. I did not want any possible movement in the rods, so investigated Thingiverse for a simple clip bracket to hold the rods in place at each end. A couple of minutes later and there was a simple little bracket design by user Hobsie which looked perfect and resolved the issue.

P3Steel Build Log (#07) – Y-Axis Carriage and Belt

By chunkyadmin,

Y-Axis Carriage Now that the clamps are sorted it’s time to fit them to the blank y-carriage, as seen below. The 2.5 DXL frame uses four points to fasten bearings, some holes in the middle for the y-axis belt tension block and the bed screws holes at each corner. The middle “sticky-outy” part seen below  … Read more

P3Steel Build Log (#06) – Y-axis Carriage Clamps

By chunkyadmin,

Bronze Bushings or LM8UU Bearings The standard Prusa builds (and most other 3D Printers, CNCs, engravers etc) use LMU88 linear bearings for all linear rod movements. They are the go to part when you use 8mm smooth rod as your axis guides and are cheap, easy to use and readily available. The quality of these  … Read more

P3Steel Build Log (#05) – Frame Feet

By ChunkySteveo,

The steel frame of the P3Steel could easily scratch up any surface it sits on, and vibrations and movement may be translated down through it’s legs. I am building the printer on a table, so was very aware of scratching it(!) A look on Thinkgiverse shows a lot of different feet for the printer, but  … Read more

P3Steel Build Log (#04) – Y-Axis Motor And Idler

By ChunkySteveo,

Part of the frame assembly (or just after) is to fasten the y-axis motor mount and belt idler. They sit either side of each other at the two ends of the printer frame. This is where this 3D printers starts it’s path away from the standard version and takes on Toolson’s upgraded and improved parts.

P3Steel Build Log (#03) – Main Frame Assembly

By ChunkySteveo,

With the frame painted and dry, first thing to do is bolt together the main structure. It slots together like a jigsaw and there was absolutely no issues or problems in this process. All the bolts and nuts used to secure the main frame parts are M3 bolts and nylock M3 nuts. The RepRap Wiki suggests  … Read more

P3Steel Build Log (#02) – Preparing and Painting the Frame

By ChunkySteveo,

The steel needs to be protected from the elements before it starts to rust – even if kept indoors the moisture from the air will begin to rust it. Because of this you need to either apply a protective layer of paint, use stainless steel which is less susceptible to rusting, or use galvanised steel. The cheapest option for me is to simply paint the frame, so that is what I did… read on!